Frequently Asked Questions

Hereunder is a select number of questions that I get posed on a regular basis. As I get more questions this list will be updated.

  1. For Graha Malika Yoga some school of thought says that it occurs when all the planets should be in a row with ONLY one planet in a sign, is this correct?
  2. How can Parabdha karma be identified in the chart and is there no remedy for that?
  3. Can you suggest more knowledgeable works for Jyotisha such as Jataka Parijata, Saravatha Chintamani etc. so that I can get access to more knowledge. (Please suggest your books as well)
  4. If only one planet is outside the Ra-Ke axis and if that planet is in Rahu or Ketu nakshatra then will the Kala Sarpa/Amṛta Yoga exists or not?
  5. Is Kala Sarpa/Amṛta Yoga applicable to divisional charts (vargas)?
  6. How to count the mantra, which rosary to use if any? Do I need to count?
  7. How many times should I recite the mantra?
  8. I read somewhere that Hinduism has both Vedic and Hindu deities. Which ones should I worship?
  9. I heard the mantra OM or AUM requires initiation. Can I do this?
  10. I heard meditation in the daytime is not good for wealth. When should one meditate?
  11. Which day to begin worship?
  12. With which attitude should I perform my daily worship or meditation?
  13. What is the case with people born at the proximity of the polar regions? Do some houses disappear/contract due to the circumpolar phenomenon? Does it imply some aspect of life are completely subdued? If say 8th house is compressed then do we interpret this as a reduction in longevity (I guess it would impact external significations if not internal).
  14. In the Bhava Chalit Chakra if the Rashis are not to be considered then how are the lordships attributed to the individual planets? What happens to Rashi Drishti?
  15. Where to draw Bhāva Chalita Chakra from? There are options of Lagna, Moon, special ascendants?
  16. Does Digbala (directional strength) get nullified if the planet changes positions in the house-based Bhāva Chalita Chakra?
  17. Visti, if a yoga occurs in the sign-based Rāśi Chart, but does not occur in the house-based Bhāva Chalit Chakra, what do we conclude?
  18. Visti, do you use True nodes or Mean nodes, and why? What does the Tradition say?
  19. Which is called as rekha and bindu in ashtakavarga, Is this different from SAV and BAV
  20. In Kala Sarpa Yoga, if only one planet is outside the Ra-Ke axis and if that planet is in Raku or Ketu nakshatra the is still KSY/KAY exists or not
  21. Which Ayanamsha do you use?
  22. Is Vedic Astrology more accurate?
  23. Few schools of thought are saying nodes don’t have lordship. Which sloka in BPHS is for the dual lordship for Scorpio and Aquarius.
  24. What is the difference between neecha banga raja yoga from Janma Lagna and Janma Moon?
  25. If multiple dasha is applicable for the chart then which maha dasha and antra dasha should be taken remedial purposes, is it only Vimshottari from Moon for all the charts irrespective of all the other applicable dashas.
  26. Does retrogression apply to divisional charts?
  27. I have a planet in retrogression yet in debilitation; does this make the planet behave like exalted?
  28. People tell me that I’m running sade sathi and that this is very inauspicious, yet I’ve been doing fine in life, why is this?
  29. I was told that I have kāla sarpa yoga in my chart. How to reckon this in my chart?
  30. How does astrology account for the birth of twins, where the birth times are so close?
  31. I’ve seen astrologers calculate Vimśottari from Lagna, but most people say that vimśottari from Moon should be used, which is accurate?
  32. There are many Daśā systems used in Vedic astrology. Which one should I choose for successful results?
  33. I did my marriage matching for my wife and I, and the Kuta-matching is really low. But instead, our relationship is very good with each other, why is this?
  34. If the Rāśi chart and bhāva chalit chakra are showing contradictory results, which one will dominate?
  35. Can one consider the exaltation/debilitation states of a planet in the divisional charts?
  36. If the Rāśi chart and the divisional charts are showing contradictory results, which will dominate?
  37. What are the results of kendrādhipati doṣa?
  38. The duḥsthāna are supposed to be inauspicious, but which is more evil; the duḥsthāna from Lagna or the duḥsthāna from the particular bhāva?
  39. What is the main difference between grahas and upagrahas?
  40. Why is the Ārūḍha of the twelfth house (Upapada) considered for marriage, and not the Ārūḍha of the seventh house?
  41. What is Kuja dosha?
  42. Which is the best remedy to solve marital problems?
  43. In case of parivartana/exchange what will happen to the conjoined planets
  44. In case of Parivartana (exchange) yoga between planets, will the Daśā effects also exchange results?
  45. What are the results of the various types of bala/strength?
  46. Saturn is Kāraka for dukha or sorrow. Does the sorrow become worse when Saturn is strong?
  47. If a planet is a benefic but lord of a duḥsthāna, will it still give beneficial results?
  48. When malefics are strong do they become more malefic or less malefic?
  49. Why do both exalted and debilitated planets give great wealth?

For Graha Malika Yoga some school of thought says that it occurs when all the planets should be in a row with ONLY one planet in a sign, is this correct?

The classical scriptures describe the yoga as having all seven planets involved in a sequence of at least 4 signs in a row, and up-to seven signs in a row and exclude the need for Lagna to be involved. That means that if Moon is in the fourth house, Mars in fifth, Mercury in the sixth, Sun in seventh and Venus in the eighth – this is a chain from fourth-eighth and is forming Graha Malika Yoga.

Where the tradition steps in is to clarify that all seven planets need not be involved, but at least 4 signs do!

To understand this we need to explore the logic of the tradition. The reason for at least four signs to be involved is that we need at least 4 planets to participate. Why this is required is that we need to have at least 50% of the planets involved in the yoga for it to be of any significant consequence in the person’s life! From there the logic gets easy, as we can now endeavour that if the nodes were involved we needed at least five out of the nine planets involved in a sequence of signs. If the nodes are not participating in the chain of signs, we need but four of the seven planets.

Beyond the logic and formation of the yoga, I would be amiss in not highlighting the elephant in the room – what does this yoga achieve?!
When I see this yoga, I accept, just like in case of Kala Sarpa Yoga, that the grahas in the beginning and end of the chain are the kings of the chart! All the other grahas have become second in importance!

The beginning-and-end grahas are either holding the chart hostage or pampering the chart with goodies. This all depends on the nature of the two planets placement and the Yoga they form with each other. Viz. if Moon initiates the series of signs, and Jupiter ends it, then its as if a beautiful Gajakeśari Yoga has formed, and the person’s entire life is endowed with education and knowledge. All the grahas are now compelled to teach the person or to act within an academical sphere.
Such compelling yogas in the chart exist, and cannot be read like every other chart.


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How can Parabdha karma be identified in the chart and is there no remedy for that?

Where the standard Rāśi (D-1) shows the body and what it is experiencing, the Navāṁśa (D-9) shows the personality occupying this body! It further acts as a filter of the karmas we are to experience in this life, also termed Prarabdha karma. In comparison, the Sanchita Karma, or whole/complete collection of karmas, is seen in the Śaṣṭyaṁśa (D-60). Thus the Navāṁśa (D-9) is important to know which of these many past lives of karma we are experiencing now. Herein, the Jagannātha Drekkāṇa (D-3J) help us to know what activities make this karma manifest!

I was taught by my teacher, that whatever experiences the planets indicate in the standard Rāśi (D-1) chart, the fixity or flexibility of these is found in the Navāṁśa (D-9), whether good or bad. Example: if say a planet is very poorly placed in the Raśi chart, then its sign placement in the D-9 tells how easy it is to overcome this.

  • If in a movable sign in D-9, then Śiva allows flexibility and some intellectual application to overcome the karmas. Pray for knowledge.
  • If in a dual sign in D-9, then Viṣṇu will allow the difficulty to be overcome provided some remedial measures are performed. Pray for resources.
  • If in a fixed sign in D-9, then both Śiva and Viṣṇu have shunned the person in overcoming the karmas, and you need to go crying to the Divine Mother, Durgā or Kalī for help. Pray for compassion.

In this way also we can help remedy the karmas in the birth horoscope.


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Can you suggest more knowledgeable works for Jyotisha such as Jataka Parijata, Saravatha Chintamani etc. so that I can get access to more knowledge. (Please suggest your books as well)

I would advise the following in their order of reading:

  1. Science of Light by Freedom Cole or Brush Up on the Vedic Astrology Basics by Zoran Radosavljevic
  2. How to judge a horoscope by BV Raman.
  3. Jyotiṣa Fundamentals, by Visti Larsen
  4. “Crux of Vedic Astrology”, By Sanjay Rath
  5. Bṛhat Parāśara Horā Śastra read along with Saravali AND Hora Ratnam.
  6. Udu Daśā by Sanjay Rath along with Vedic Remedies in Astrology, by Sanjay Rath
  7. Jataka Parijata read along with Sarvartha Chintamani.
  8. Jaimini Upadeśa Sūtras read along with Narayana Daśā, by Sanjay Rath
  9. Collected papers in Vedic Astrology, by Sanjay Rath
  10. Bṛhat Nakṣatra, by Sanjay Rath

If you read Brhat Jataka, then make sure you read it along with Praśna Marga, Saravali and Hora Ratnam to understand it. Daśādhyayi is also read with it. If you read Yavana Jataka, then read it along with Hora Ratnam.


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If only one planet is outside the Ra-Ke axis and if that planet is in Rahu or Ketu nakshatra then will the Kala Sarpa/Amṛta Yoga exists or not?

As long as the planets share the same sign as the node, then irrespective of degrees the Kala Sarpa/Amṛta will function. However, if in the same nakṣatra but different signs, then the Yoga will not function.

To learn more about the Kala Sarpa and Kala Amṛta Yoga, do read my write-up here: https://srigaruda.com/kala-sarpa-yoga-to-my-friends/


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Is Kala Sarpa/Amṛta Yoga applicable to divisional charts (vargas)?

Yes and no is the answer. Yes, because it will work in that specific divisional chart, i.e. if Kala Sarpa Yoga happens in Daśāṁśa (D-10) you may be encouraged into illegal activities during your profession.

No, because if it occurs only in the Daśāṁśa (D-10) then it happens only when you go to work, but not in other aspects of your life, and thus the all encompassing effects of the yoga are not there.


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How to count the mantra, which rosary to use if any? Do I need to count?

Keeping count is recommended for mantra-recitation, and not for meditation. Herein, the count acts as an offering to the deity, and thus if using the fingers for counting, we face them palm-upwards as an offering, or the rosary is held up high at the height of our heart, as an offering. In case of a rosary, it may not touch the ground or legs/feet, and is at best kept in a pouch or bag to hide the offering from all but one’s personal deity. Thus the covering or bag is meant to hide the rosary from anyone but one’s deity whom one keeps as secret as the rosary. The implication of this is also that worship is best done in secret.

If you know how to use the ‘kāramāla’, or counting with fingers, then it is recommended to learn. This is a specific method also taught in the book Mantra Yoga Samhita:

Kāramāla, Mantra Yoga Samhita by Ram Kumar Rai.
Top hand is for male deity worship, and the bottom is for female. Left-image is for counting the first hundred, and right-image is for the remaining eight, to complete 108. The right hand is used for this, as the left is used to keep count of the right.

If counting with fingers is too confusing, rosaries are recommended.

  • Guru is worshipped with all types of rosaries, but Haldi (turmeric) is specific to the Guru. This is also recommended for Hanuman worship.
  • Rudrākṣa Rosary is for Śiva and Gaṇeśa. Gaṇeśa is also worshipped with Red Coral or gemstones.
  • Pravala or Rakta Chandan (red sandalwood) is for Sūrya and Gayatri.
  • Tulsi is for Viṣṇu and Lakṣmī. Black Tulsi is specific to Kṛṣṇa.
  • Śakti is worshipped with a variety of rosary, but pearl and Spatik (rock-crystal) is specific to her, as is Śveta Chandan (white sandalwood). Komala (lotus-seed) is also popular but difficult to maintain. This is recommended for those seeking to marry. Sarasvatī is also worshipped with Spatik.

Under no circumstances are rosaries made of human or animal bones recommended for worship.


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How many times should I recite the mantra?

Unless otherwise specified by the teacher providing the mantra, a guideline is to count the number of words in the mantra and multiply by the number of rosaries.

Viz. for the mantra: om̐ namaḥ śivāya, the 3 words are: om (1) + namaḥ (1) + śivāya (1) = 1+1+1=3. Thus the general recommendation is to recite this mantra 3×108 times, or 3 malas/rosaries.


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I read somewhere that Hinduism has both Vedic and Hindu deities. Which ones should I worship?

This idea is a huge misnomer, which seems born out of a scholars view and not a Vedic tradition’s understanding.

This scholarly inference comes from the reading of the Ṛgveda where the header-sections mentions only devatā belonging to a select group such as Indra, Soma, Agni, Dyaus, etc. However, a more detailed reading of the Ṛks of the veda reveal a more nuanced situation, viz. one Ṛk for Agni reads:
pāvaka naḥ sarasvatī vajebhir… Now, nowhere in the headers was the Goddess Sarasvatī mentioned, but yet her name appears in the specific Ṛk! Yet, the Vedic traditions consider this mantra to be the Sarasvatī Gayatri, and dedicate it to Goddess Sarasvatī. Similarly, should we read a Ṛk dedicated to the Devatā Annam:
upa naḥ pitavā cara śiva śivābhirūtibhiḥ… Clearly the mention of Śiva is given twice herein, proving the Lord Śiva is mentioned in the Ṛgveda.

A cursory reading of the Sukta headers of the Ṛgveda, places the deities mentioned in specific groups of Devatā belonging to the various created Sapta-loka. These are said to be responsible for maintaining the creation of the universe established by Śrī Brahmā, and possibly their listing in the sukta-headers implies a means of reaching the higher lokas belonging to Viṣṇu, Śakti, Śiva, etc.

To conclude, there is no difference between Hindu and Vedic forms of divinity.


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I heard the mantra OM or AUM requires initiation. Can I do this?

om̐ is the initiation given during the Gayatri initiation, after which the mantra converts from being the Savitur Gayatri to the Brahma Gayatri for the initiate. However, this is only because the original Gayatri mantra written in the Ṛgveda does not include the om̐. Thus this condition only applies to the Gayatri mantra, and not other mantras which naturally include om̐ in them.


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I heard meditation in the daytime is not good for wealth. When should one meditate?

Its important to differentiate between meditation and worship or mantra recitation. Meditation is an activity of deep rest or almost sleeping, where one attempts to hang unto the mantra or image of the deity alone, and nothing more. This is a twelfth house activity and is not auspicious to perform during the daytime, as the Sun, the ruler of the day, is poorly placed in the twelfth house.

Therefore, meditation is recommended when the Sun is not visible in the sky.

Conversely, mantra-recitation can be performed in the daytime, without any consequences.


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Which day to begin worship?

This depends on two factors, firstly the form of divinity and secondly the purpose of worship. In any case, the days of worship are particular to one’s personal worship, performed in one’s home, whereas Vedic Rituals are done once or twice a month during the occurrence of the Lunar day (Vedic Tithi) or star (Nakṣatra) personal to the divinity.

For personal worship, sunrise worship is for knowledge, vitality and energy, midday for wealth, sunset for one’s relationships and longevity, and midnight for liberation, nirvana/mokṣa and end of one’s mundane existence. As the latter is not a peaceful process, it is not recommended to pursue midnight worship until specifically instructed by a spiritual teacher, as the particular worship will call upon very destructive energies into one’s life.

For the FIRST day of worship, prefer a morning, unless specifically instructed otherwise.

As a general guideline we can instruct the following for personal/home worship:

  • Gaṇeśa is worshipped on Wednesday morning or Tuesday evening. In all cases, it is generally instructed to worship Gaṇeśa when the Sun is not visible in the sky.
  • Guru, Sarasvatī and Ṛṣi (Sages/seers) are worshipped from Thursdays. Sometimes the Ṛṣi is worshipped on other days to meet a specific agenda or purpose.
  • Sūrya is worshipped on Sunday or Tuesday morning or midday. Sūrya worship is not performed after midday.
  • Savitur or Brahma Gayatri can be performed at all times, and is begun from a Wednesday or Thursday.
  • Digpala and specific Rudra forms are worshipped on Saturdays mornings and evenings respectively. Note that Rudra and Śiva are not the same.
  • Grahas are worshipped on their respective days, viz. Soma is worshipped on Mondays, Mañgala is worshipped on Tuesdays, etc.
  • Viṣṇu, Nārāyaṇa, Kṛṣṇa and all his forms, avatars, etc. are worshipped beginning from Thursdays mornings or midday, but generally, all times are appropriate for Viṣṇu.
  • Śrī, Lakṣmī and all her forms are worshipped from a Friday.
  • Śakti and her multitude of forms deserve special attention. Generally, Durgā is worshipped either from a Tuesday (for protection as Chaṇḍī or Chamuṇḍī) or Friday (for prosperity as Durgā, Annapūrṇā, Padmavatī), and at best during the evenings only or before sunrise. Her forms as the ten Mahavidyā have specific days allotted to them during the week, and should be learned from a competent teacher.
  • Śiva is best worshipped when the Sun is not in the sky, during either Mondays (for family and marriage) or Thursdays (for knowledge). We generally advise Monday worship to invite a spouse (husband) and Thursday after marriage has taken place.


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With which attitude should I perform my daily worship or meditation?

The bhava or worship should be one of wishing to associate or spend time with the chosen form of worship. Some say we should have affection for the deity, or that we should be disciplined and pious, all attitudes which are good but not becoming for a permanent relationship with the form of divinity. A wish to associate is a friendly and familiar association, which brings you closer to the chosen form of worship and has a binding nature.


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What is the case with people born at the proximity of the polar regions? Do some houses disappear/contract due to the circumpolar phenomenon? Does it imply some aspect of life are completely subdued? If say 8th house is compressed then do we interpret this as a reduction in longevity (I guess it would impact external significations if not internal).

This compression of houses does not happen with the use of the Bhāva Chalit Chakra given by Parāśara Muni. Herein, the house spans are equal of 30 degrees each, and begun from the ascendant degree. The method you are referring to is not Vedic.


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In the Bhava Chalit Chakra if the Rashis are not to be considered then how are the lordships attributed to the individual planets? What happens to Rashi Drishti?

The signs/Rāśis are to be considered, only the WHOLE house takes on the energy of the Bhāva cusp it occupies. Example: in my case my Lagna is in Scorpio, and Mercury is in Libra. But due to the Bhāva Chalit Chakra boundaries formed by my Lagna, my Mercury moves within the span of the Lagna, thus ACTING as if in Scorpio! That is the power of the mind to imagine circumstances which are not there. Rāśi dṛṣṭi (sign aspects) will work as if my Mercury is in Scorpio for the purpose of the Bhāva Chalit Chakra. But again, the Bhāva Chalit Chakra is only my perception, not reality.


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Where to draw Bhāva Chalita Chakra from? There are options of Lagna, Moon, special ascendants?

Principally we draw this from everywhere, but context is important. For the use of examining how we perceive the world, draw the chakra from Lagna.


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Does Digbala (directional strength) get nullified if the planet changes positions in the house-based Bhāva Chalita Chakra?

Yes, it does get nullified as the directions of houses are based on the ascendant/Lagna degree. Planets receiving directional strength in the Bhāva Chalit Chakra have the power of our mind to change reality to suit our imagination. This power is given by the protectors of the directions of karma, or Digpala, sitting in the heavenly abode of Svarga Loka.
Hope you liked this newsletter. Here’s looking forward to providing you many more!


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Visti, if a yoga occurs in the sign-based Rāśi Chart, but does not occur in the house-based Bhāva Chalit Chakra, what do we conclude?

I almost never read the Bhāva Chalit Chakra. Bhāva Chalit Chakra is the domain of our perception, and if it differs from the sign-based Rāśi chart, then our perception also differs from reality. As an astrologer, it is pivotal for me to know what is real, and what is imagined. The Bhāva Chalit Chakra is the domain of our imagined world.

If a yoga occurs in the Rāśi Chakra, but not in the Bhāva Chalit Chakra, we fail to perceive the yoga as manifesting. This is because our mind would not perceive that event occurring, like a gifting a ruby to a monkey – they would see it solely as another rock.
Conversely, if new planetary combinations occur in the house-based Bhāva Chalit Chakra, these are like castles in the sky created by our mind and have no hold over reality.
It should be noted, that some rare individuals can through the power of their imagination, work to create their own realities, hence the need for the Bhāva Chalit Chakra


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Visti, do you use True nodes or Mean nodes, and why? What does the Tradition say?

In the words of my teacher, “the True nodes are hardly true”. Mathematically True Nodes are an elaboration of the Mean Mode calculation, and whilst it is presented in the work “Sūrya Siddhānta”, the True Nodes were not employed in the same work to display chart calculations for Jyotish reading, but instead for the ascertainment of eclipse occurrences. Hence Traditionally, True Nodes are not used. Instead, Mean Nodes are.

Another reason presented for using the Mean Nodes as per the tradition is, that True Nodes oscillate between retrograde and direct-motion. This breaks the paradigm of the Jyotish philosophy in that the Luminaries are always direct, the Nodes are always retrograde, and the five remnant Tara Graha oscillate between these two states.

A node in direct motion goes against the nature of the nodes! My experience is what convinced me of the accuracy of this, and whilst I encourage everyone to examine this on their own, the advise of the Tradition is to employ Mean Nodes in chart examination.


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Which is called as rekha and bindu in ashtakavarga, Is this different from SAV and BAV

Rekha means line and Bindu means dot. Parāśara states that Rekha is auspicious, but later works of other authors consider the same calculation for rekha but term it as bindu instead, thus causing confusion in terminology, but the application is the same.

In the tradition we follow Parāśara and consider Rekha as auspicious as it shows that which is manifesting and symbolizes the ‘nada’ or crescent Moon in the sound om̐. The dot or bindu is unmanifested and is thus considered inauspicious instead.

SAV or Sarva-aṣṭakavarga is the collection of all the planets rekha into one sign. BAV or Bhinna-aṣṭakavarga is grouping only those rekha that have arrived in one group, i.e. only those beloning to Sun’s Aṣṭakavarga are termed Sūrya-Bhinna-aṣṭakavarga.


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In Kala Sarpa Yoga, if only one planet is outside the Ra-Ke axis and if that planet is in Raku or Ketu nakshatra the is still KSY/KAY exists or not

Even if a planet joins the node in the same sign it qualifies as Kala Sarpa/Amrita Yoga, despite not being within degree-boundary of the nodes.

However, any planets join the nodes or the ascendant/seventh house also have the opportunity to offer a break to the yoga, and free the individual from their plight.


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Which Ayanamsha do you use?

Like my teacher, Pt. Sanjay Rath, I use true Chitrapakṣa Ayanamsha. This implies using the exact degree of Spica as the 0 degree point of Libra, and thus forming the zodiac.

Why don’t we use Lahiri Ayanamsha? Because Lahiri’s Ayanamsha was supposed to be updated to adjust for the movement of Spica/Chitra, and was not. Since then the calculation has become obsolete compared to actual star positions.

Why don’t we use Sūrya Siddhānta Ayanamsha calculations? Because they do not match with the observed/actual positions of planets and stars on the heavens. The following statement will clarify from Siddhānta Sundara:

Prior to this the Sage Vasiṣṭha adds:


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Is Vedic Astrology more accurate?

Often this question is asked in comparison with the Western Tropical School of Astrology.

Vedic Astrologers are known for being more fatalistic in their approach to discerning the person’s events of life. This is their focus and prides them as being more accurate.

However, the Western Tropical School had the same approach until the works of Alan Leo become the main school of Astrology. Alan Leo wished for astrology to be a science of ‘tendencies’ to avoid legal repercussions for ‘fortune-telling’ as it was indicated in the then laws of Great Britain. This ensured the survival of astrology at the time, but its former legacy of William Lilly, who was instrumental in guiding people during the British civil-war, would have been forgotten.

So which school is more accurate may depend more on the astrologer and their proficiency.


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Few schools of thought are saying nodes don’t have lordship. Which sloka in BPHS is for the dual lordship for Scorpio and Aquarius.

Sage Parāśara states this in the Daśādhyāya (Chapter 46), verse 157, here cited for you:

Following this, the Sage elaborates how to decide the stronger among them for the singular lordship of their signs.

Practically, in tradition, we do not treat the nodes as the lord of Lagna for examining the person’s body and physical health. We do employ them for examining mental health. Further, in reading the chart and the Ārūḍhas we first ascertain the stronger lord but do examine the placement and Ārūḍha of the weaker when its daśā arises. Viz. if Scorpio is the Lagna and Ketu is stronger than Mars, then the Ārūḍha formed by Ketu will be the most prominent. However, during the Mahadaśā or Antaradaśā of Mars, the placement of Mars and its Ārūḍha will temporarily manifest until the end of the daśā.


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What is the difference between neecha banga raja yoga from Janma Lagna and Janma Moon?

Nīcabhañga, or the removable of debilitation, need not always cause Rājayoga or opulence/success. When the debilitation of a planet is removed or remedied, the given planet becomes stronger, but whether it strengthens you or your challenger will decide whether its Rājayoga or Daridrayoga.

Now, when a planet is debilitated, it’s starting point is a low one of deprivation or humility. If that same planet is exalted in the Navāṁśa then with time the person surely rises out of the deprivation and attains success.

If the Navāṁśa does not offer this blessing, then we need to examine three planets carefully: 1. the lord of the planets exaltation sign, 2. the lord of the planets debilitation sign and 3. the planet whom is exalted in the debilitation sign. Viz. for Mars debilitated in Cancer these planets become 1. Saturn, 2. Moon and 3. Jupiter. These are termed ‘Bhañga-graha‘. If EITHER of these three Bhañgagraha are placed in Kendra/quadrants to either the Lagna or the Moon, they will away 1/3rd of the debilitation results. Therefore the MORE whom do so, the better the result! Now, if this happens from the Lagna then the person will naturally achieve this through their own efforts and they just need time to achieve this. If however this occurs from the Moon then the results are dependent on their own attitude and interaction with society which does not guarantee the desired outcome! Therefore in the latter case we advise mantras for the given bhañgagraha to achieve the positive results.


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If multiple dasha is applicable for the chart then which maha dasha and antra dasha should be taken remedial purposes, is it only Vimshottari from Moon for all the charts irrespective of all the other applicable dashas.

Traditional astrologers aspire to ascertain three Udu/Nakṣatra daśā for an individual.

  1. One universal daśā for public purposes – this is Viṁśottari daśā from the Moon/Janma Nakṣatra. This is ALWAYS used in case of politicians, actors and public figures.
  2. One specific daśā for private purposes to see the family/married life and deep emotional interactions – this is a variation of Viṁśottari daśā from either of Moon, Lagna, Ātmakāraka, Kṣema, Utpanna or Adhana Nakṣatra – whichever is applicable. You can learn more about these variations through my YouTube video with Anuradha Sharda: Daśā Sandhi
  3. One specific daśā for the individual/inner life. Herein we are trying to understand the inner view of the person, their view on their achievements, purpose and success/failures. Here we need to ascertain if a specific conditional Udu daśā is applicable from among 10 daśā systems given by Sage Parāśara namely Viṁśottari, Aṣṭottari, Śodaṣottari, Dvadaśottari, Panchottari, Śatabdika, Dvisaptati Sama, Chaturshiti Sama, Ṣaṣṭihayani and Ṣaṭtrimṣat Sama. Besides Viṁśottari, the remnant are only calculated from the Moon’s Nakṣatra.

It may arise that only one or two daśā-systems arise from the fray of options, which only makes one’s reckoning of the chart easier.


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Does retrogression apply to divisional charts?

Retrogression is a pure astronomical phenomenon, and a planet in a state of retrogression is retrograde in all divisional charts as well. The same applies to combustion. However, in interpretation, this is ignored in the divisional charts.

To learn more about retrogrades, do see this webinar: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ODU7Nwz3xOM&t=9999s


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I have a planet in retrogression yet in debilitation; does this make the planet behave like exalted?

Yes it does, however, it should be kept in mind that retrograde planets have two primary states; (1) having just entered retrogression and moving towards the peak of retrogression. (2) Having attained the peak of retrogression and slowly ending its retrograde state and moving into stationary motion. In case of (1) the desire of the graha is very strong and very determined. Such an individual will strive very hard to attain the desires indicated by the planet. In case of (2) the native is slowly ceasing his/her desires and moving towards equilibrium.


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People tell me that I’m running sade sathi and that this is very inauspicious, yet I’ve been doing fine in life, why is this?

Sade Sathi is the 7½ year transit of Saturn over the twelfth, first and second houses from the natal Moon sign. However whilst most astrologers apply this in the Rāśi chart, the tradition teaches to apply this in divisional charts as well. This is based on the understanding that the transit of Saturn in the Rāśi chart, only affects the body/health; whilst in the divisional charts it can affect particular areas of life like marriage (Navāṁśa) or career (dasāmśa). Example: if Moon is in the Navāṁśa of Leo, and Saturn enters Cancer in the Rāśi chart, then the intimacy in marriage/relationships will suffer. Some people call this method of using transits; “Bhṛgu transits”.
Also, each 2½ year transit has a special significance; the transit over the twelfth from Moon causes personal life and relations to suffer. The transit over the Moon sign itself causes one to make wrong decisions, mistakes and delays one in attaining one’s desires. Finally, the transit over the second from Moon gives bad or little food, little resources and wealth and many worries.
Further, the effects of each year can also be analyzed based on the Nakṣatra transited by Saturn, whilst the Navāṁśa of Saturn’s transit tells us about the span of a three month period, and how it affects us. Such principles can be learnt from Chandra Kāla Nāḍi (Deva Keralam).


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I was told that I have kāla sarpa yoga in my chart. How to reckon this in my chart?

Many people are born with kāla sarpa yoga or its sister; kāla amṛta yoga. This yoga is like a cage of sorts, involving all the planets. Draw a line from Rāhu to Ketu, splitting the zodiac in half. If all the grahas occupy one half, then it is kāla sarpa/amrita yoga. If they occupy both halves, then there is no such yoga. Next, put your finger on Rāhu, and move zodiacally through the zodiac until you reach Ketu. If you have passed all the grahas when doing so, then the yoga is kāla amrita yoga. If you pass none, then it is kāla sarpa yoga.
Planets conjoined the nodes or placed in the first or seventh houses from Lagna, help break the yoga in their natural ages. The person does not see real success in life before 42 or 45 depending on whether its kāla sarpa or kāla amrita yoga respectively.
Kāla Sarpa Yoga means the native is trapped in a community of serpents and is being asked to continue the spread poison in the society. This can cause damage to the environment, to the social structure and people. Depending on the Lagna the person may not accomodate this and instead of enslaving people will decide to free them. Kāla Amṛta Yoga is the opposite, namely one who is asked by the community to seek freedom for the world, its occupants and to give nectar to the world. These are people exposed to highly spiritual philosophies and if the lagna supports such as person will break all social norms in seeking freedom. An example is given of the author:

Visti Larsen, 21st November 1981, 6:06 AM, Nairobi, Kenya

Visti Larsen, born 21st November 1981, 6:06 AM, Nairobi, Kenya. All planets are hemmed between Rāhu and Ketu, where when counting zodiacally from Rāhu to Ketu we find all planets within. Thus Kāla Amṛta Yoga is born and a true freedom seeker is born. The Lagna is Scorpio and is surrounded by benefics and a sattvic graha – Sun on the Lagna, thus this person will wanto support and agenda of doing good for the world and giving happiness and freedom to people. Further Ketu, being the king of the Kāla Amṛta Yoga, is also lord of the Scorpio Lagna indicating a person who will go out of his way to pursue spirituality. Lagneśa in the third house is also Dhimantaḥ Yoga indicating the pursuit of knowledge being the key focus. With dispositor Saturn in the 11th house this is clearly the pursuit of Jyotiṣa knowledge under a Guru’s tutelage. Thus an average kid born to parents of a western society, went out of his way to pursue a path of spiritual knowledge.


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How does astrology account for the birth of twins, where the birth times are so close?

Since Vedic astrologers rectify birth times with a precision down to one vighati (twenty-four seconds), a better question would be how astrology accounts for people born on the same birthplace at the same birth time. Finding such cases is usually reserved to logicians and not astrologers. Invariably the past-life karmas of the two individuals cannot be the same; hence the sixtieth divisional chart (ṣaṣṭyamśa) will be the different in the case of twins.
Specifically for twins, the tradition holds some keys to differentiate between the events in the lives of twins, triplets or other multiple births. I.e. the last born among the twins is said to be the first conceived and if the twins share the same Lagna then this child is said to be the Lagna and the other (first born) is the third house. The interpretation of the chart is then done from those houses as Lagna for the respective twin. Should the Lagna be an even sign then instead of the third house the eleventh house is examined. For triplets the Lagna will be the last born, the third will be the second born as the fifth house will be the first born. In this way the twins, triplets, etc. can be deduced from the chart. This practice is performed for all the divisional charts where the twins share the same ascendant, except the D-60 where they are expected to have different ascendants.


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I’ve seen astrologers calculate Vimśottari from Lagna, but most people say that vimśottari from Moon should be used, which is accurate?

In śloka 33 of the 18th chapter of Jātaka Parijata, Vaidyanath Diksita states that Vimśottari Daśā should be calculated from four positions; (1) Lagna Nakṣatra (2) moons Nakṣatra (3) name Nakṣatra (4) moons Nakṣatra during praśna. Further in śloka 34 and 35, the use of vimśottari from the fourth, fifth and eighth Nakṣatra from the Moon is used for longevity. This gives a total of seven options to start vimśottari from!
Among these for natal charts, most people use Vimśottari from Lagna or Moon, depending on which is stronger. Both are applicable, but in cases where the Lagna is stronger (more planets in Kendra), the events will be clearer from Lagna-vimśottari. Especially in cases of Kala Sarpa/Amrita Yoga! The Vimśottari from the fourth, fifth and eighth Nakṣatra from the Moon, is used in natal charts to time failings in health and the demise of an individual.


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There are many Daśā systems used in Vedic astrology. Which one should I choose for successful results?

An astrologer, who is predicting the events for other people’s lives, should choose the Daśā based on (1) their own ability or preference, (2) applicability in the client’s chart.
(1) To identify which Daśā suits the astrologer best, the three Graha; Sun, Moon and Jupiter should be seen in the astrologer’s chart. Their placement in Kendra/Koṇas is auspicious for the them, whilst duḥsthāna is inauspicious. If the Sun is best placed, the native should develop their ability with Naisargika Daśā, Kendrādi Daśā (Mūla, Ātmakāraka Kendrādi, etc) and Rāśi based Daśā. Notably, Naisargika Daśā should be applied in all charts. If instead, the Moon is strong, the Nakṣatra Daśā are the most preferable, including Mūla Daśā. If Jupiter is the strongest, then Nārāyaṇa Daśā, Buddhi-gati Daśā and other Lagna based daśās are the most preferable.
(2) In a client’s chart, the Daśā which best explains their theme of life should be preferred. Spiritual people require the use of Dṛg Daśā, whilst businessmen need to know their Su-Daśā. The conditional Udu Daśā take into account these differences in ideals and paths in the criteria for the Daśā.
Finally, the astrologer should aspire to master at least two Daśā for general predictive-purposes and two Daśā systems for longevity based predictions. In the tradition, for general purposes Naisargika Daśā is compulsory whilst for longevity Śūla Daśā is compulsory.


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I did my marriage matching for my wife and I, and the Kuta-matching is really low. But instead, our relationship is very good with each other, why is this?

There are various points to address here. Firstly, most people only perform matching based on the moons of the couple. However, the matching of moons (especially moons-Nakṣatra) has a stronger relevance in the matching of the two couple’s families or the society that the two belong to. viz. if the Moon’s are misplaced from each other the families of the couples will cause the couple to separate, despite a good marital relationship. Instead, if matching is done between the Lagnas of the two, the intellectual and mental matching will be more clear and consistent in giving results.
Secondly, some matching techniques are more or less important to apply in the couple, which disproves the use of the point system. Gotra matching is more important in couples who work together, or where their principles shouldn’t clash. Similarly Varṇa kuta is also important for couples who work together.
Stri-dīrgha kuta is always worth analyzing to determine the support that the wife is getting in society from the husbands family and social circle. If the Strī-dīrgha is bad, then the support will be stronger from the wife’s side, and not be present from the husband’s side.
Vaiśya matching is usually only temporary, and only necessary if it is required to attract the two partners.
Rajiu matching from Moon and Gana matching from Lagna should always be considered and are very accurate.
These matching principles are performed both for arranged and love unions.


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If the Rāśi chart and bhāva chalit chakra are showing contradictory results, which one will dominate?

The difference between the bhāva chalit chakra and the Rāśi chakra will be greater when the Lagna degree is in the beginning or end of a sign. When the Lagna degree is placed such, the intellect and view of the native becomes distorted to some extent. This distortion causes a different perception of the events revolving around the native, and this new perception is seen from the bhāva chalit chakra. It is important to point out that one’s perception creates a reality for us. Example: perception can lead us to think that we can establish a successful business, and we may even go ahead and try to establish it. However the business may not last if the perception is not true. Hence the Rāśi chart always dominates as it is the truth, but we need to analyze the perception from the bhāva chalit chakra.


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Can one consider the exaltation/debilitation states of a planet in the divisional charts?

Yes, as long as we are considering the placement of planets in certain signs and drawing a new chart, we a required to also consider the state of that planet in that sign, as well as its relation to other signs. Graha dṛṣṭi and Rāśi dṛṣṭi are also considered in divisional charts.


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If the Rāśi chart and the divisional charts are showing contradictory results, which will dominate?

The Rāśi chart covers the entire life, but unfortunately is only indicative of what the future may bring. The divisional charts are complementary to the prediction and can help get the exact details about the particular events which may occur in a person’s life. Example: from the Rāśi chart we can ascertain the number of children that the native may have, but the details about each pregnancy their sex and the fortunes experienced by each child is seen from the saptāmśa (D-7). In this way the divisional charts are complementary to a detailed prediction.


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What are the results of kendrādhipati doṣa?

Kendrādhipati doṣa means; the ‘the affliction ascribed to the lords of quadrants’. It refers to the ability of malefics lording a Kendra to shed its malefic results, whilst the benefic lording a Kendra to shed its benefic results. The benefic lording a Kendra will not shed its benefic results if it is well placed, in a Kendra or a trikoṇa. Instead the benefic will become more benefic as a result.
For malefics, their malefic influence is not completely shed unless placed in a duḥsthāna, whereas its placement in a Kendra or trikoṇa will not allow it to shed its malefic results. If the malefic is also lord of a trikoṇa or joined a trikoṇa lord, then it produces vipareet raja yoga.


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The duḥsthāna are supposed to be inauspicious, but which is more evil; the duḥsthāna from Lagna or the duḥsthāna from the particular bhāva?

Again Praśna Mārga comes to our help. Chapter 4, śloka 42: “If the lord of a bhāva occupies a favourable house from itself, then the effects of that bhāva will be full. If the lord occupies a favourable house from the Lagna, the effects of the bhāva will be well experienced”. In other words; if the lord of a bhāva is in a duḥsthāna from Lagna, then the native will experience sorrow and misery on account of that bhāva. But if the lord of the bhāva is placed in a duḥsthāna from the bhāva, then the bhāva itself will suffer, but one’self may not experience this sorrow or misery.


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What is the main difference between grahas and upagrahas?

The word ‘graha’ comes from the word ‘grahaṇa’ or ‘to eclipse/seize’. This refers to the ability of the planets to take control of our minds and make us think and act like them. The prefix; ‘upa’ refers to those planets which are of secondary significance, i.e. they are of lower significance. An Upagraha cannot take control of our mind, but of particular body functions, causing spasms, blockages or freak episodes. Hence an Upagraha cannot control our way of acting, as the grahas do, but they can control specific limbs and organs, and cause accidents or problems.


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Why is the Ārūḍha of the twelfth house (Upapada) considered for marriage, and not the Ārūḍha of the seventh house?

Both are used, however, the Ārūḍha of the seventh house or dārapada (A7) is used to see our mate in matters of sexuality, just like animals have a mate. However human beings go a step further and have the option of spending their entire life with one mate, and this cannot be considered as a mere sexual partner, as is the case with the dārapada (A7).
Upon being born we have earned a debt to our ancestor’s up to seven generations back. To repay this debt we have only 2 choices; 1) marry and have children to continue the lineage (Kāraka Jupiter). 2) Renounce perfectly (Kāraka Saturn). If we do not perform either of these, our ancestors will not be at peace. In fact some say the consequences are much more extreme, and we will carry this debt to our next lives. Now this debt is not some duṣṭa karma which is seen in the eighth house, but a debt to our creator. The creation is caused by Sūrya when he transits the twelve Rāśi, and hence the name Sūrya or Āditya also means twelve. It is from this basis that the sūryāmśa or dvadaśāmśa is created which shows our parents and grandparents according to Pārāśara. It is a debt for having being created, which is seen in the twelfth house.
Now we’ve established that the twelfth house shows how we repay our debt to our ancestors (and also the deva). This debt is repaid either through marriage or perfect renunciation, and how we are repaying this debt is seen from the Upapada, as this is how our debt is manifesting in the world, i.e. through the Ārūḍha. That is why Pārāśara and Jaimini state that malefics in the upapada can cause renunciation.
So the Upapada shows either our marriage or the lack of the same. It also shows who we will choose to marry (if the choice is ours), and hence can indicate the Lagna of the spouse. It shows how long the marriage will last in society as a marital contract, and can also show whether such a contract was written or not for the relationship.


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What is Kuja dosha?

Kuja doṣa, Manglik doṣa is commonly understood as the affliction of Mars. This is one of the most commonly talked about afflictions in marriage cases. It happens when Mars has graha dṛṣṭi on the seventh house in a chart. Here particularly its fourth and eighth house dṛṣṭi is considered most evil. For this reason, Mars in twelfth, fourth and seventh is considered kuja doṣa. Mars in the fifth house is not considered inauspicious as it sits in the house of worship. Additionally, Mars’ placement in the eighth house is considered evil for the sustenance of marriage. An easy memory tool is given by my Guruji: trines to the fourth house (4th, 8th and 12th) including the māraka houses (2nd and 7th) are the houses of water, and where fire (Mars) should not sit!
The placement in the twelfth, fourth and seventh house is said to delay marriage until after the twenty-eighth year of age, unless Saturn associates. Jupiter’s association does not remove the delay but promises marriage when the native has matured. Marriage before twenty-eight is usually not advised, as it can cause violence and severe fights in the marriage – regardless of Saturn’s association. Jupiter’s association will however calm this down, but will not remove the delay.
Mars in the eighth house gives fear of early break of marriage or the premature demise of the spouse, which should be further analyzed from the second the Upapada (UL). In any case the yogas with the seventh house should always be confirmed by analyzing the Upapada (UL).


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Which is the best remedy to solve marital problems?

Fasting on the day of the Upapada (UL) is the best method to solve marital problems, proven time and time again. The fasting should be performed from sunrise to sunset. The more sincere the fast, the better the results. Water is allowed, if necessary. If absolutely necessary the native may have uncooked foods such as fruits. This fast is not recommended if the lord of the Upapada is also the lord of the second house. In such cases Tithi fasting is advised based on the house of the lord of Upapada, i.e. if the lord is placed in the third house then fasting on the 15th day of the bright fortnight is advised. This Tithi is lorded by Saturn and if the second lord is Saturn then again fasting is not recommended.


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In case of parivartana/exchange what will happen to the conjoined planets

The an exchange occurs in a chart, it forces one of two scenarios:

  1. The signs of the planets exchange: viz. if Sun is in Capricorn in 2nd house and Saturn is in Leo in 9th house, then the chart will behave as if Sun is in Leo in 2nd house, as Saturn is in Capricorn in 9th house – houses stay the same but signs move!
    Now if say Mars was joined Saturn in the 9th house, it will now move with Leo to join Sun in the 2nd house! This can sometimes cause planets to become stronger after the exchange. In all cases, the planets causing the exchange, due to their lordship, become very strong in the chart!
  2. The planets move, but the signs stay the same: This happens when a planet is exalted in either of the sign involved in an exchange, viz. if Mars is in Libra in 10th house, Venus in Aries in 4th house but Sun is in Aries exalted, then the signs cannot move, and instead Venus moves to the 10th house and Mars to the 4th house, with the signs staying the same, and Sun staying in Aries in 4th house.

In all cases, unless the Lagna, Lagna Lord or Ārūḍha Lagna is involved in the exchange, the exchange will not function from birth but may arise later in life during the natural ages of the planets.


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In case of Parivartana (exchange) yoga between planets, will the Daśā effects also exchange results?

Some changes occur when in a parivartana, and the type of change will depend on the type of parivartana being in Rāśi, Nakṣatra or Navāṁśa. But in all cases the nature of the planet, its placement and lordship will not change. Parivartana can involve the dual lordship of signs of the nodes (Aquarius & Scorpio) and Moon (Taurus) as well.

Rāśi parivartana: When a parivartana occurs in the Rāśi, the two planets are working together to cause a change. This change is from the nature of one planet to the nature of the other, i.e. from one Guṇa to another. Example: A parivartana between Sun and Mars is a change in Guṇa from Sattva to Tamas, or from Tamas to Sattva as these are the Guṇa of Sun and Mars. The change also involves the houses, Kāraka and Tattva of the planets, to give the exact details about this change. Which of the two comes first in this exchange, depends on who the change is affecting the most. If one planet is in the Lagna, Ārūḍha Lagna or joined Lagneśa, then the transformations result will be of that planet. If one of the planets in the exchange is badly placed or afflicted, then the result of the exchange leaves the person indicated in bitterness.

Nakṣatra parivartana: A parivartana in the Nakṣatra causes a change in the minds of the people in society, and can heavily modify the Daśā for people who live in the limelight of society. The results of the parivartana should be judged from the planets placement from the Moon.

Navāṁśa parivartana: the Navāṁśa indicates the relationships one has with people. If a parivartana occurs, then it can change the nature of the people one associates with during an entire Daśā.
To learn more read my Parivartana articles: [Link]


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What are the results of the various types of bala/strength?

The Parampara teaches that the various bala have different effects. Many of them are based on the planet’s position in the sign or house and will confirm the astrologer’s prior estimation of the chart. Many astrology software’s do not take into account the position of planets from points other than the Lagna, and the astrologer should not let their prediction rely solely on the strength calculations of a planet.
Vimśopak bala: A planet strong in vimśopak bala gets great support from the world. Here the ten and sixteen varga-scheme is used for human beings, whilst the six and seven varga scheme is used for Praśna and Muhurta respectively. This can be useful in predicting the results of electoral support.
Śadbala: Literally ‘six strengths’ based on the planets position, time, direction, motion, sight and nature. Each of these strengths can be used independantly, but the result in its entirety can be used to determine the strength of the planets Kāraka.
Iṣta and Kasta phala: This method of strength is used to decide the amount of auspicious/inauspiciousness that one may face in a Daśā. This can be moderated by the Antaradaśā. Adding the points of the mahā and Antaradaśā and dividing by two can be used to decide the results of the Antaradaśā. If the number is below thirty, then the results are inauspicious. Incase of the nodes, they will give the results of the planets they are joined, or the planet lording their sign if unconjoined.
Āṣṭakavarga bala: A small introduction into the finer principles of Āṣṭakavarga have been given in my book, Jyotish Fundamentals, however some clarification is given. The strength of a planet in its own Bhinna Āṣṭakavarga will indicate the more help that it has been given from other Kāraka. Example: In a mundane chart for a nation, the strength of the Sun in its Bhinna Āṣṭakavarga will show how much support the king or leader is getting to do his work. The planets which contribute will show who is supporting the king. If in a natal chart Saturn in is own Bhinna Āṣṭakavarga has many points it is inauspicious, as it shows how many sources of sorrow or sin are prevalent in the natives life, hence making its strength inauspicious. This cannot be used to determine the strength of yogas, only the amount of resources drawn by the planet.
Vaiśeṣikāmsa bala: This source of strength is used to determine the extent or height that one’s raja yoga or dhāna yoga can take one to. This is the correct method to determine the strength of raja yogas.


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Saturn is Kāraka for dukha or sorrow. Does the sorrow become worse when Saturn is strong?

Praśna Mārga answers this as well. Chapter 4 śloka 32: “When the planets from Sun onwards are strong, their karaka is predominant in life. If weak they will exist only in name. However, if Saturn is strong his inauspicious karaka will be felt less.” This is in line with the answer to Question 2, regarding the strength of malefics.


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If a planet is a benefic but lord of a duḥsthāna, will it still give beneficial results?

To clarify, Harihara the author of Praśna Mārga has answered, in chapter 4, śloka 37: “A planet capable of giving rise to both bad and good, confers only good results if he is strong and only evil results if he is weak.” This answer also clarifies the case of natural vs. functional benefics or malefics.


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When malefics are strong do they become more malefic or less malefic?

Thankfully Praśna Mārga gives us the answer to this. Chapter 4, śloka 35: “Benefics if strong contribute good fully. Malefics if weak give evil in full.” Here it may be inferred that the weaker a planet, the less auspicious it becomes.
To add to this we need to examine the houses that the grahas are in to understand more. Auspicious houses such as Kendra or Koṇa are responsible for giving us blessings. Strong benefics here make the blessings received nicely and one benefits. Strong malefic here block these doors and the blessings are spent on fighting. Therefore malefics are preferred weak in the Kendra and Koṇa. Similarly the Duḥsthāna are where our energy is spent and leaves us. If strong malefics sit in the Duḥsthāna then our energy doesn’t leave us whereas strong benefics here makes the energy leave more rapidly. Hence benefics are preferred weak in Duḥsthāna for material prosperity.


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Why do both exalted and debilitated planets give great wealth?

Mahāṛṣi Jaimini states; “taśmin ucche neeche va śrīmantaḥ”, namely that both exalted and debilitated planets make one wealthy. The state of the planet will indicate the mind-state of the people who will give one wealth. When a planet is exalted the person is very happy and extremely joyful and will give lots of money to experience more joy. One could be satisfying others with enjoyment in the form of entertainment, selling holidays, movies, etc. Instead, a debilitated planet indicates a person in great fear and in need. To remove their fear they will gladly give away their money to ensure their security, i.e. as a repairman or involved in security. Inimical planets due to their disgust, will not give any money at all, and if any it will be very little, whilst neutral, and friendly planets will give more money, followed by own sign, Mūlatrikoṇa and exaltation/debilitation which give most.


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